Dave Neal

  • Google: Right to be Forgotten? We're Not complying

    Google has, after some consideration, come to its own terms with the European court-ordered Right to be Forgotten, and decided, after a year-long period of thinking, feedback and interaction with local data privacy outfits, to limit the forget-me-now service to the European and not global market.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watchin Google- 14 readers -
  • Google Given Right to Appeal in Safari Cookies Case

    Google has been given the right to appeal in the U.K. against a ruling in a legal case that boils back down to the infamous Safari 'Cookiegate' incidents of the early 2010s. The problem was the collection of data and the implications of that collection in relation to the U.K. Data Protection Act (DPA). So far, debate about this has kept the courts ready for almost four years.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watchin Google- 5 readers -
  • Apple Amping Up Maps to Compete With Google

    Apple has acquired GPS software company Coherent Navigation in a move to bolster Apple Maps' location and mapping capabilities. Apple has not had a smooth ride in the mapping business. Apple Maps was blighted with problems and inaccuracies at launch, and the firm apologised to its customers and suggested that they use alternatives like Google Maps.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watch- 3 readers -
  • Google Grants 40 Percent of Right to Be Forgotten Requests

    Search and web company Google has revealed that it has received almost one million URL takedown requests and complied about 40 percent of the time in the year since it has been applying the European right to be forgotten. The controversial right to be forgotten ruling has been accepted reluctantly by Google, and the firm has spent much of the past year questioning its obliga ...

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watch- 7 readers -
  • Google Limits "Right to Be Forgotten" to Europe

    Google told an audience in Lisbon that it will limit right to be forgotten requests to Europe for now. The company has offered the right to be forgotten ever since the European Court of Justice ruled that it should. It has done this with obvious reluctance and has regularly thrown up the system for debate. The tech giant has now said that it would like to keep it as local as possible.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watchin Google- 5 readers -
  • Google Opens Its Domain Registration Service Doors

    Google has kicked off its domains-for-all program and is letting users take on a domain and make a website. The search giant is competing with outfits like GoDaddy, but with a purely U.S. focus. The company is offering a domain registration service that has already proved itself during a preview period. This may all sound a bit 1990s, but bear with Google.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watchin Google- 5 readers -
  • "Bad Code" Update Brings Yahoo and Bing to Standstill

    Some Internet users were unable to search using Yahoo or Microsoft over the weekend after a snippet of bad code brought services to a standstill. Reuters quoted an inside source who claimed that a problem at Microsoft rolled onto the Yahoo service and left a lot of people unable to perform searches.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watch- 5 readers -
  • The NSA Has a Hush-Hush Google-Like Search Engine

    The United States National Security Agency (NSA) has its own homegrown search engine that it offers to similarly minded U.S. intelligence outfits. Website The Intercept was first to report this and attributes its news to information provided by whistleblowers. It says that the search engine is shared with a number of other U.S. organizations and institutions.

    Dave Neal/ Search Engine Watchin Google- 2 readers -