Graham Oakes

  • The two types of project failure

    There are two types of project failure. You need to manage them differently. Projects fail.Lots of them. We don't really know how many, as the statistics vary widely. And most of the statistics are pretty dubious. They’re gathered using questionable sampling methods. They define failure ambiguously. And their authors generally have a vested interest in talking up failure rates.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancy- 4 readers -
    Earlier about the same topic:
  • The two types of project failure

    There are two types of project failure. You need to manage them differently. Projects fail. Lots of them. We don't really know how many, as the statistics vary widely. And most of the statistics are pretty dubious. They’re gathered using questionable sampling methods. They define failure ambiguously. And their authors generally have a vested interest in talking up failure rates.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancy -
  • When should I review a project?

    The best time to review a project is probably months ago, when all seemed well. It doesn't look good. The project has missed a major milestone. The team is working seven-day weeks. The project manager is off with stress-related illness. Quality has gone out the window. And as for our customer, not at all happy. We need to find out what’s really going on.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancy- 3 readers -
  • What is 'best practice'?

    Are you doing what's best, or simply seeking the protection of the herd? It’s an enticing idea: 'Best practice'. It suggests a clearly defined path to success; a recipe for perfectly honed websites, trouble-free projects, delighted users; a silver bullet. But what is 'best practice'? I don’t mean best practice for UX design, or best practice for SEO, or best practice for project execution.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancy- 3 readers -
  • Building innovation into project management

    If your organisation is going to do any sort of substantive innovation, it needs to take on risk. That needs a different style of project management. Why do you do projects? For most organisations, the answer is usually something to do with change. “We need to add new features to our product. We need to improve the user experience in our online shop.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancy- 7 readers -
  • How complex can it be?

    Managing complexity is tough. Especially if you can't agree on where the complexity lies. Sometimes decisions are easy. You have the data you need. You know what you want to achieve. You know how things work – if we do this, then that will happen. So you connect the dots, make the decision, and all is well.

    Graham Oakes/ Econsultancyin How To's- 6 readers -