Botnets

  • How to protect yourself against ad fraud

    … We have come a long way in our examination of online ad fraud. So far, we have learned: what ad fraud looks like, why it exists and who should be responsible for stopping it. Today, we are going to learn about the practical matter of protecting yourself, as a marketer, against ad fraud. In a perfect world, fraudulent inventory would never make…

    Ratko Vidakovic/ Marketing Landin Display How To's- 13 readers -
  • Who Should Be Responsible For Stopping Programmatic Ad Fraud?

    …) as their agent to sell their inventory. Advertisers (the demand side) use DSPs as their agent to buy that inventory. So, as we move down the supply chain from publishers, we have to start by looking at SSPs. This is a key point: Fraudulent publishers cannot take part in the programmatic ecosystem without an SSP enabling them with the technology…

    Ratko Vidakovic/ Marketing Landin Display- 28 readers -
  • Why Programmatic Advertising Fraud Exists

    … users suffer from all of these improper incentives, mainly in the forms of poor user experience: slow-loading websites, click-bait journalism, excessive behavioral tracking, botnet and malware proliferation, and so on. And they’ve decided to take measures into their own hands. Last but not least, an obvious observation: Ad fraud simply doesn’t…

    Ratko Vidakovic/ Marketing Landin Display- 23 readers -
  • The Many Faces Of Programmatic Ad Fraud

    …, for example, but is no way related to Facebook’s actual ad inventory. After all, any Facebook user could tell you that there are no 300×250 or 728×90 banner placements. But with ad injection, inventory can be created on premium websites out of thin air. • Cookie Stuffing: The practice of cookie stuffing is nothing new to the world of online advertising…

    Ratko Vidakovic/ Marketing Landin Display- 29 readers -
  • Facebook Tests Onion URL for Tor Users

    … some assumptions of Facebook’s security mechanisms — for example, its design means that from the perspective of our systems, a person who appears to be connecting from Australia at one moment may the next appear to be in Sweden or Canada. In other contexts, such behavior might suggest that a hacked account is being accessed through a “botnet…

    David Cohen/ AllFacebookin Social Facebook- 5 readers -
Get the top posts daily into your mailbox!
More from around the web