Perfect Forward Secrecy

In cryptography, forward secrecy (also known as perfect forward secrecy or PFS) is a property of key-agreement protocols ensuring that a session key derived from a set of long-term keys cannot be compromised if one of the long-term keys is compromised in the future. The key used to protect transmission of data must not be used to derive any additional keys, and if the key used to protect transmission of data is derived from some other keying material, then that material must not be used to derive any more keys. In this way, compromise of a single key permits access only to data protected by that single key.
Posts about Perfect Forward Secrecy
  • Facebook Tests Onion URL for Tor Users

    … our site securely. People connect to Facebook in many different ways, which is why we have implemented HTTPS across our service, and Perfect Forward Secrecy, HSTS and other technologies that help give people more confidence that they are connected securely to Facebook. That doesn’t mean we can’t improve yet further. Consider Tor: Tor challenges…

    David Cohen/ AllFacebookin Social Facebook- 5 readers -
Get the top posts daily into your mailbox!