Richard Feynman

Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics (he proposed the parton model). For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965.
Posts about Richard Feynman
  • The Biggest Reason It’s Hard to Recognize Genius

    … would want a computer in their home,” said Digital Equipment Corp. president Ken Olson in 1977. When FedEx founder Fred Smith presented his idea for an overnight delivery service to his management professor at Yale, the professor shot it down. “In order to earn better than a ‘C’,” he said, “the idea must be feasible.” “The best startup ideas seem…

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