Signal-To-Noise Ratio

Signal-to-noise ratio (often abbreviated SNR or S/N) is a measure used in science and engineering that compares the level of a desired signal to the level of background noise. It is defined as the ratio of signal power to the noise power, often expressed in decibels. A ratio higher than 1:1 (greater than 0 dB) indicates more signal than noise. While SNR is commonly quoted for electrical signals, it can be applied to any form of signal (such as isotope levels in an ice core or biochemical signaling between cells).The signal-to-noise ratio, the bandwidth, and the channel capacity of a communication channel are connected by the Shannon–Hartley theorem.
Posts about Signal-To-Noise Ratio
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    Jonathan Mendez is CEO of Yieldbot, an intent-based ad platform. I have some bad news for real-time bidding. The Web is getting faster, and RTB is about to be left behind. Now, 120 milliseconds is becoming too long to make the necessary computations prior to page load that many of today’s systems have been built around.

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