Street Culture

    • Street Culture: Taking Estimote’s ‘No Barriers’ Culture Literally

      In a conference room, a sign on the wall says, “This is a no bullshit zone”. At beacon company Estimote, people are trying to take that statement extremely literally. The company’s mission is to build a new operating system for the physical world, and to get there the team needs zero bullshit. Culture is far too important to leave to chance, says John Cieslik-Bridgen, Estim ...

      Street Fight- 20 readers -
    • Street Culture: Metrics for a Global Community

      While some company founders sit down and write out their core values and identify what their company’s culture should be before they even find the people who will help them, others just go with their gut. For Pete Gombert, founder of local marketing company Balihoo, his gut feeling about culture has turned into a whole new company.

      Street Fight- 15 readers -
  • Street Culture: Six Vertical Pivoting its Culture with its Company

    … There are two options if you want to be a tech startup owner — one is to attach yourself to someone else’s startup in the early stages so you have equity options. The second option is to do it yourself. Doing it yourself often comes with a painful side effect, says Joshua Enders, managing partner of client success at digital commerce company…

    Street Fight- 13 readers -
  • Street Culture: Balancing Structure and Exploration in Company Culture

    … values around the customer. At software platform development company Dispatch, the company’s fixation on providing the best service for the customer means that even new employees might need to travel. At meal delivery service company Lish, focus on the customer is one of the company’s three core values. And at in-store analytics company RetailNext…

    Street Fight- 23 readers -
  • Street Culture: Pointy Focusing on People and Product, Not Process

    … Dublin-based digital search platform startup Pointy is still at that point where the culture is just what it is, without special definitions or structure. “I’ve been at companies before where the employees are silo-ed into sales teams and engineering teams,” says Mark Cummins, co-founder of Pointy. “The number of people on our team now…

    Street Fight- 17 readers -
  • Street Culture: Why Telecommuting Makes Sense for Some Tech Startups

    …, such as a culture that is heavily dependent on personal contact with key individuals within the organization.” But the option does work for a lot of companies — and for many startups, remote work is a built-in part of how a company initially gets off the ground. Kristen Stiles, co-founder and CEO of babysitter-finding app Sitter.me, told Street Fight…

    Street Fight- 24 readers -
  • Street Culture: A Changing Culture of Inclusion and Conversation at Dispatch

    … be a challenge, and they’re directly related to the company’s growth. “Startup employees are natural entrepreneurs,” he says. “They’re natural go-getters. They don’t hold back and they do what’s necessary to get the job done. The challenge you run into as you grow is that every conversation expands from two to five people, and then to 10 people and to 20…

    Street Fight- 15 readers -
  • Street Culture: Cuebiq’s Aggressive Growth Bolstered by Candid Culture

    … that is experiencing a lot of change, is really important,” he says. “The employees don’t have to second guess what is happening; it creates an environment where people feel they are part of the company.” In the last year, only one employee chose to leave the company, Tomarchio says, which speaks to how this type of candid openness and respect-building culture can…

    Street Fightin Mobile- 36 readers -
  • Street Culture: Tech Startups Amping Up Opportunities for Women

    … Leadership is often a driver of company culture, even though some startup company CEOs and managers say that culture is driven by the employees. Every company is different, and in this industry the quality of communications helps welcome and nurture people. For many companies, transparent sharing and openness at all levels is inviting a new…

    Street Fight- 23 readers -
  • Street Culture: Sitter.me Puts Company Culture of Trust and Respect First

    … Barely a month after kicking off in the TechStars startup accelerator program in Boulder, Colorado, Sitter.me co-founder and CEO Kristen Stiles is adamant that her company’s culture will not change – not now, with three and a half employees, and not years from now, with potentially hundreds. “When I sat down, before [co-founder] Matt came…

    Street Fight- 18 readers -
  • Street Culture: inMarket Retains a ‘Startup Mentality’ as It Scales Up

    … Todd Dipaola is a scientist, but right now, he’s making money in ad tech. Dipaola is the CEO and founder of mobile proximity advertising platform inMarket, and his left-brain “test everything” mentality is helping push the company toward success. Advertising is inherently creative, says Dave Heinzinger, inMarket’s vice president…

    Street Fight- 44 readers -
  • Street Culture: Year-Old JumpCrew Builds for Scale, Eschews ‘Startup Culture’

    … processes are what Pachter is working with now at JumpCrew. “You don’t see that at a startup,” Pachter says. “You see people trying to squeeze the apple to get the most juice. We’re trying to nurture that apple to get a bigger apple. That’s the biggest difference between startup culture and building for scale.” The company launched about one year ago…

    Street Fight- 32 readers -
  • Street Culture: At Ibotta Good Ideas ‘Come From Anywhere’

    … Four office locations in five years — either something went wrong four times, or something is going very right. Ibotta, the fast-growing mobile shopping app, moved again this year when the company outgrew its third location faster than anyone had expected. Alison Meadows, vice president of human relations, told Street Fight that Ibotta is fast…

    Street Fight- 16 readers -
  • Street Culture: How Placeable Employees Own the Company’s Culture

    … “Own your accomplishments and own your failures.” It’s a basic statement that Ari Kaufman says with emphasis (pretty much how he says everything, it seems). It’s important, and part of what motivates him and his employees at Placeable, a four-year-old location marketing company based in Denver. “We want people to not be afraid to stand up…

    Street Fightin How To's- 11 readers -
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